Bainton on Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage in the Reformation

Just finished Roland Bainton’s classic work The Reformation of the Sixteenth Century. Bainton’s is an evenhanded treatment of the complexities of the Reformation scene, allowing for the messiness of sin and politics while reading the principle players sympathetically. There were a number of fun little gems, but just one this morning. In his chapter on…

Karl Marx & Justification by Faith

Just had a fun time being interviewed by Classical Conversations radio yesterday. We talked about the Christian concept of work, the world as a treasure hunt, and how the Fall inhibits our labor. You can listen to the whole interview here. One of the questions I was asked, I thought I would elaborate on a…

In Defense of the Protestant Reformation or How the New Eve Got More Lovely

Anyone who’s read this blog for any length of time knows that I can wax polemical from time to time. Given my story and the little tree stump I’ve been given, some of my more polemical writing has centered on the goodness of Protestantism, the necessity of the Reformation, and various angles on why I…

Jesus is Enough Freedom: Col. 2:16-23

Introduction We said last week that forgiveness is the foundation of our resistance to all lies, half truths, and empty philosophies. This is because guilt is what makes us vulnerable. Guilt is what makes us captive to every tyranny. It doesn’t allow us to see clearly.  But the flip side of this truth is therefore…

Calling Latin Peeps

A friend of mine has an old (1663) KJV Bible with the following Latin quote (ascribed to Luther) hand inscribed in one of the front pages: “Pactum feci Domino Deo meo, ne mihi mittat vel visiones, vel somnia, vel etiam angelos. Contentus enim sum Hoc Dono, quod habeo Scripturam sanctum, qua abunde docet, ac suppeditat…

Putting on the Armor of Light: Resources for Lent

For those wondering about what we teach or think about the season of Lent at Trinity. Here’s what we print in the front of our bulletins during this season: “Lent is the season of the Church calendar that spans the 40 days leading up to Easter. Lent is from the old English word which means…

How the Reformation became a Revolution

The Reformation would not have happened if ordinary people had not convinced themselves that they were actors in a cosmic drama plotted by God: that in the Bible he had left them a record of his plans and directions as to how to carry them out. Their revolution was not simply a search for personal…

The Rebirth of the Whole World

When we say that we are evangelicals, one of the things we are proclaiming is that we believe in reformations. The first reformers in the Protestant Reformation were called evangelicals, and so we align ourselves with them. But the larger point is that we believe that this is how God intents to get this project…

Why Protestants Still Protest

Towards the end of the last millennium, Peter Leithart writes: One of the lesser-known works of John Calvin is a tract whose short title is “An Inventory of Relics.” It is predominantly a sharp attack on the extremes of medieval Catholic piety-practices that I imagine many Catholics would today dismiss as empty superstitions. Samples of…

Wild Truth

Another follow up thought on the Douthat post below: This American “openness to heresy” seems to me to be a peculiarly Protestant stance, particularly, a sort of political/social manifestation of Sola Scriptura. Protestantism rejects human authority as supreme (whether in prelacy or tradition), and insists that Jesus is the head of the Church, ruling through His…